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National News
  • Justice Department's criminal division names new No. 2

    U.S. prosecutors Miller and Nardini talk with a reporter at the end of a news conference in RomeBy Aruna Viswanatha WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Justice has named Marshall Miller as the new No. 2 official in its criminal division, after a spate of departures thinned its top ranks, according to an internal memo obtained on Wednesday. Miller, who was most recently chief of the criminal division at the U.S. Attorney's office in Brooklyn, is now the deputy head of the 600-lawyer criminal division at department headquarters in Washington, said a DoJ memo dated April 17. "He's done a great job in Brooklyn," said John Buretta, Miller's predecessor in the criminal division until last November when he joined the law firm Cravath, Swaine & Moore.


  • U.S. Justice Department announces clemency review of drug offenders

    U.S. Deputy Attorney General James Cole speaks on cyber security at the Cybersecurity law summit in WashingtonBy Julia Edwards and Aruna Viswanatha WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Justice Department laid out new clemency guidelines on Wednesday that are expected to make thousands of drug offenders eligible for a reduction in the sentences they are currently serving. Under the new guidelines, inmates that were sentenced under laws that have since changed, have served at least 10 years of their sentence and are nonviolent may be re-examined by the Justice Department and suggested to the president for clemency. Deputy Attorney General James Cole, who announced the details of the plan, said the most obvious candidates for review were those sentenced before a 2010 law that lowered the terms for crack cocaine possession charges. "These older, stringent punishments that are out of line with sentences imposed under today's laws erode people's confidence in our criminal justice system," Cole said at a news conference on Wednesday.


  • U.S. Army plans to remove about 2,000 officers due to budget cuts

    A soldier stands outside the venue for memorial service at Fort Hood, TexasBy Jim Forsyth SAN ANTONIO, Texas (Reuters) - The U.S. Army is looking to cut about 2,000 positions for captains and majors by the end of the year as part of its overall plans to reduce its active duty numbers due to budget cuts, the Army's chief of staff said on Wednesday. "Probably this year, we will ask 1,500 captains to leave the service, and we will ask probably 400 to 500 majors to leave the service," General Ray Odierno, the Army's top officer, told reporters at an event in Texas. "That is because we have to get down to the appropriate size." The Pentagon said last month it would shrink the U.S. Army to pre-World War Two levels, eliminate the popular A-10 aircraft and reduce military benefits in order to meet 2015 budget spending caps. He said the planned cut of the Army to 490,000 active duty soldiers will be reached by the end of 2015 and will not prevent the service from carrying out its current missions.


  • Biologists watching fish runs after deadly slide

    In this photo taken Tuesday, April 15, 2014, fisheries biologist Pete Verhey tags an overhanging branch after finding a salmon spawning nest in Squire Creek, a tributary of the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River, near Darrington, Wash. Finding the nest, called a redd, is an encouraging sign that steelhead trout may be making their way upstream from Oso., Wash., above where a massive landslide decimated a riverside neighborhood a month ago and pushed several football fields worth of sediment down the hillside and across the river. As search crews continue to look for people missing in the slide, scientists also are closely monitoring how the slide is affecting federally endangered fish runs, including Chinook salmon and steelhead. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)DARRINGTON, Wash. (AP) ? Fisheries biologist Pete Verhey waded through the cold, clear creek that feeds into the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River, scanning riffles and side channels looking for evidence of fish eggs.


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